Create a Team, add Members in Microsoft Teams upon Project and Team Members creation in PSA / Project Operations | Power Automate

Let’s take a simple use case where you need to have a Microsoft Team created in Teams and have the Project Members added to the Microsoft Teams’ Project Team.

You can simply do this using 2 simple Flows in Power Automate

Scenario & Setup

If you are a PSA Customer, you would want to create a Team in Microsoft Teams based on what Project it is and then add Team Members of the Project as Team Members in the Microsoft Teams’ Team you created.

Let’s look at a Simple example of how you can do this. And further, you can enhance the implementation yourselves based on whether a Project becomes Inactive, or someone is to be removed from the Project Team.

I’ll be creating 2 Flows for this purpose –

  1. One that will create a Team in Microsoft Teams upon Project Creation and
  2. Other, will add Member to the Project’s MS Team upon addition of the Team Member in Project in PSA/Project Operations.

Create a Team for the Project

Let’s look at the first scenario where you can create a Team in Microsoft Teams once create a Project in PSA.

  1. Flow to trigger off of a creation of a Project.
    |
  2. Now, search for create a team in the next step to find a Microsoft Teams connector’s Action to create a Team in Microsoft Teams.


  3. Assign the Name of the Project and Description of the Project for easy understanding. You can make the team Private which is ideal to keep users’ Teams cleaner and also keeps Project discussions isolated if that’s the need.


  4. Once a Team is created, I’ve created a field on Project record to hold the MS Teams’ ID for other references.

    Add a step to update the Project back with the created MS Teams’ ID like this

    And in that, I’ll update the Created Team’s ID

  5. Now, fetch the Project Manager’s User record in CDS (PSA, basically) so that the User’s ID can be used to make the Owner of the Team you are creating.

  6. Next, you need to add Members to the Team. Look for add a member to the team and you’ll find Microsoft Teams’ action which you can use.

  7. Here’s how the Add a team member looks like.

  8. Now, this is a little tricky. Since you don’t get the Dynamic Values right away in this Action, click on Add a custom item.

  9. In Add a custom item, you can add the Team ID of the MS Team you just created for the Project in step #3 above.

    Once you add it, it’ll look like below

  10. And for the User’s AAD ID step, set the System User’s (fetched in #5)

    Add Azure AD Object ID

  11. Now, the last step looks set.

Add Members to the Project Team

Let’s work on the other scenario with other Flow. This will be on trigger of a creation of a project Team Member.

  1. This second will fire off on creation of a Project Team Member. Hence, the trigger on Create of a Project Team Member.

  2. I’ll get the Project record since I need the MS Teams ID which is a custom field we created to store the MS Team’s ID on the Project.

    Again, you can do this easily if you know how to get related records. I’ve done an extra step for simplicity.


  3. Now, the next step is to retrieve the Bookable Resource‘s Record. In turn, we’ll retrieve the System User record associated with the Bookable Resource record on the Project Team so that the System User’s ID can be used.
    Just because I need the Azure AD Object ID (User) entity, I’ve written a fetch XML on the Bookable Resource entity to go and get the User record’s Azure AD Object ID. I’ll need this to map it in the step where we’ll add the Member to the Project’s created Team.


    My step to retrieve Bookable Resource + System User’s Azure AD ID looks as below. Make sure you select the Bookable Resource GUID reference from the trigger i.e. the Creation of the Project Team Member record to ensure we only get 1 record.

  4. Then, I’ll simply generate a Parsed JSON after the above Step so that I can get to select the required attribute to select in the Team’s Add a Team Member step (Because the related field is not available for Dynamic Values) (In case you know how to directly write using outputs() function, that should be good enough too!!)


  5. Now, add the Team Member to the Project’s Team in MS team. Again, as mentioned above in the previous Flow, use the Add a member to a team Action from Microsoft Teams connector to do so.
    Now, add the Team’s ID in the Team field.

    On the Team field, you’ll need to Add a custom Value like we did in the previous Flow.



  6. And for the final step, in the User AAD ID for the user to add to a team step, you can pick the parsed Azure ID field from #4 above.

  7. As soon as you select from Parse, the Flow step will be converted to Apply to each. But that’s because we used List records which returns multiple values. Even though Apply to each is applied, this will logically run only once anyway!!

  8. Now in the user AAD

Working

Now’s let’s see all this in action.

  1. Let’s create a Project in PSA. Notice I’ll enter the name and the Description since we are creating a Team in MS Teams and that’s what we are filling out. Notice that MS Teams Project ID is blank. Our Flow will populate that once a Team is created in Microsoft Teams.
    Notice that Joe Danny is the Project Manager on the Project, he will be the Owner of the Team we are creating in MS Teams as per our first Flow.


  2. A Team like this will be created in Microsoft Teams.

  3. Also, notice that in the Project in PSA, a MS Teams Project ID will be populated too.

  4. Also, notice that Joe Danny is the Owner of the Team since Joe is the PM on the Project.

  5. Now, let’s add 1 more Team Members to the Project in PSA. Now, I’ve added a new Team Member Priyesh in the Project’s Team.


  6. That team member also get added as Members in Microsoft Teams in the Project’s Team. This is from out second Flow we created to add the Team Members to the created Teams for a PSA Project.


Here are some more enrichments you’ll need to do to handle some scenarios –

  1. Separately handle if a Project is Canceled/Deactivated for some reason.
  2. Remove Members from an MS Teams if they are removed from the Project.

Hope this was useful.

Here are some more posts about Project Service Automation (PSA) in Dynamics 365 / Microsoft Teams that might be helpful –

  1. Cancelled Bookings Imported in Time Entries in Dynamics 365 PSA issue | [Quick Tip]
  2. Task Completion reminder using Flow Bot in Microsoft Teams | Power Automate
  3. Change Booking Status colors on Schedule Board for Field Service/PSA [Quick Tip]
  4. Additional columns in PSA v3 Schedule view
  5. Check Managed Solution failures in Solution History in Dynamics 365 CRM
  6. Modify Project tab’s view in Schedule Board in PSA v3 | Quick Tip
  7. Update Price feature in D365 PSA v3
  8. A manager is required for non-project time entries, absence, and vacation error in D365 PSA v3
  9. Time/Expense Entry Rejection comments in D365 PSA v3
  10. PSA v3 View Custom Controls used on Project form

Thank you!!

Setting Lookup in a Flow CDS Connector: Classic vs. Current Environment connector | Power Automate Quick Tip

Both the CDS and CDS Current Environment connector are similar yet different in the way how they accept Lookup values set in their Update a record steps.

Here’s a quick tip!!

Scenario

Taking a simple example of setting Primary Contact Lookup on Account.

We’ll do the same thing using both the connectors mentioned below.

Common Data Service connector

Common Data Service (Current Environment) connector

Common Data Service Connector

Let’s start with using the classic Connector first –

  1. As mentioned in the Scenario above, let’s first try to use a class Common Data Service connector. Here’s how you identify the same.

  2. Now, whenever you have to set the Lookup value in the classic connector’s Update a record action, you can simply tag the Primary Key as is on the field in the connector step as shown below.


    And lookup can be tagged very easily.

Common Data Service (Current Environment) Connector

  1. Let’s do it with the new Common Data Service (Current Environment) connector. This is a much simpler way to tag a Lookup. Now, the new CDS Current Environment connector can be identified as below.

  2. In order to set Lookup, you’ll need to patch is in the below way
    pluralNameOfTheEntity([PrimaryKey])

  3. Here’s how my friend Linn Zaw Winn’s post explains in details of why we have to choose the plural name and exactly where you can get it from – http://linnzawwin.blogspot.com/2019/11/power-automate-how-to-set-lookup-field.html

Hope this was useful. Here are some more Power Automate / CDS posts which you might want to check out –

  1. Using outputs() function and JSON Parse to read data from missing dynamic value in a Flow | Power Automate
  2. Adaptive Cards for Outlook Actionable Messages using Power Automate | Power Platform
  3. Make On-Demand Flow to show up in Dynamics 365 | Power Automate
  4. Task Completion reminder using Flow Bot in Microsoft Teams | Power Automate
  5. Run As context in CDS (Current Environment) Flow Trigger | Power Automate
  6. BPF Flow Step as a Trigger in CDS (Current Environment) connector | Power Automate
  7. Accept HTTP Requests in a Flow and send Response back | Power Automate
  8. Call HTTP Request from a Canvas Power App using Flow and get back Response | Power Automate
  9. Setting Retry Policy for an HTTP request in a Flow | Power Automate
  10. Adaptive Cards for Outlook Actionable Messages using Power Automate | Power Platform

Thank you!!

Using outputs() function and JSON Parse to read data from missing dynamic value in a Flow | Power Automate

I faced this issue lately and not sure if it’s a bug or something I might be missing. But, I couldn’t find anything in Dynamic Content in a Flow and I was not able to pick fields to use further in a Flow.

Not sure how many of you faced this since most fields you need are available in a Flow’s Dynamic Content part.

Scenario – Adaptive Cards for Teams issue

I had this one scenario in particular where the Adaptive Card I created for Microsoft Teams’ User sends back Response but the Dynamic Content doesn’t appear in the steps after the Card Step.

  1. See below that I’ve declared a Variable just to show that the Dynamic Content that should appear after the Adaptive Card.

  2. And if I press the Dynamic Content as shown above in Step #1, and minimize all the content, I don’t see the Teams’ Dynamic Content variables at all

  3. And the Adaptive Card didn’t return the below Outputs



    That’s when we should use outputs() function to read this data.

outputs() function

Here’s how you can use the Parse JSON action and outputs() method to read the Outputs of the step you want and then Parse JSON so that these can be picked as variables/dynamic values in steps following this –

  1. Take Parse JSON action from Data Operations in a Flow

  2. In that in Inputs, you can use Function on the Content field.

  3. And write outputs function as shown below –

    And the complete the function as below

    Explanation:
    MyCard is the name of the step of my AdaptiveCard I used. If the name of you step has spaces like “My User Adaptive Card”, then the function will look like outputs(‘My_User_Adaptive_Card’)[‘body’]

    body is written because if you see in the Outputs originally in the Scenario section above, all results are sent in body field of Outputs.

  4. Now, since you don’t know the Schema, just put a “{}” so that you can Save the step. (This is required)

  5. Run the Flow once and collect the Outputs from this ‘Parse JSON 2’ step as shown above.
    Copy the Outputs

  6. Now, open the same Parse JSON 2 step which you created. And click on Generate from sample

  7. And paste the schema in the box.

  8. Once done, schema will be generated like this.

  9. Now, this Parsed Outputs can be further used which will have the data from the Step which didn’t yield Dynamic Content
    Example, I’ll create a variable to show Dynamic Content that can pop-up

  10. It’ll show all the fields from the Card in the Parse JSON 2 outputs


    And that solves the problem!!

    Original Microsoft Documentation on the same is: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/logic-apps/workflow-definition-language-functions-reference#outputs?WT.mc_id=DX-MVP-5003911

Hope this was helpful.

Here are some more Power Automate / Adaptive Card content you might want to look at –

  1. Adaptive Cards for Outlook Actionable Messages using Power Automate | Power Platform
  2. Make On-Demand Flow to show up in Dynamics 365 | Power Automate
  3. Save Adaptive Cards work using VS Code Extension – Adaptive Cards Studio | Quick Tip
  4. Adaptive Cards for Teams to collect data from users using Power Automate | SharePoint Lists
  5. Task Completion reminder using Flow Bot in Microsoft Teams | Power Automate
  6. Run As context in CDS (Current Environment) Flow Trigger | Power Automate
  7. Using triggerBody() / triggerOutput() to read CDS trigger metadata attributes in a Flow | Power Automate
  8. Run As context in CDS (Current Environment) Flow Trigger | Power Automate
  9. Terminate a Flow with Failed/Cancelled status | Power Automate
  10. Pause a Flow using Delay and Delay Until | Power Automate

Thank you!!

Save Adaptive Cards work using VS Code Extension – Adaptive Cards Studio | Quick Tip

If you’ve started working on Adaptive Cards recently and always struggle with losing Adaptive Card payload from https://adaptivecards.io/designer/, you should use the Adaptive Cards Studio Extension.

So there’s a Visual Studio Code Extension for the same which will help you preserve and preview the Adaptive Card you are working on.

Problem Statement

While working with Adaptive Cards, we often struggle to make sure the browser tab doesn’t gets closed accidently and you lose your progress on the Adaptive Cards you are working on.


And, if you are struggling to maintain the Card Payload in a temporary file, there’s a smarter way available to do so using VS Code’s Extension – “Adaptive Cards Studio”

VS Code Extension – Adaptive Card Studio

Here’s how you can use the Adaptive Card Studio and how it can be useful.

  1. Open Extensions in Visual Studio Code and search for Adaptive Cards Studio

  2. Once installed, it’ll appear on the left hand side as below –

  3. On the right hand side in VS Code, it’ll search for the Workspace for the Adaptive Cards to detect. Make sure the folder in which your Adaptive Cards is saved is added to the Workspace.
    Else, the Extension won’t detect an Adaptive Card.


    In case you have saved the JSON file elsewhere which is not added to your Workspace, you can use this option to add the Folder to your current Workspace. (Depends on your Project structure)

  4. Once the correct Folder is added to Workspace in VS Code, the Adaptive Card you saved will appear


  5. If you expand the card, you’ll find Template and Data which you can get and paste from the Adaptive Cards online Designer and paste the same in here.

  6. Now, if you look at the main Window, you’ll be able to see the Template and Data JSON on the left and the Card on the right

Here’s the link to the GitHub for complete Info on the Adaptive Cards Studio: https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=madewithcardsio.adaptivecardsstudiobeta

And then further, copy the Payload onto your application where this will eventually be deployed.

Hope this was useful!

Here are some more posts that relate to Adaptive Cards usage / Power Platform –

  1. Adaptive Cards for Outlook Actionable Messages using Power Automate | Power Platform
  2. Adaptive Cards for Teams to collect data from users using Power Automate | SharePoint Lists
  3. Task Completion reminder using Flow Bot in Microsoft Teams | Power Automate
  4. Accept HTTP Requests in a Flow and send Response back | Power Automate
  5. Run As context in CDS (Current Environment) Flow Trigger | Power Automate
  6. Using triggerBody() / triggerOutput() to read CDS trigger metadata attributes in a Flow | Power Automate

Thank you!!

Adaptive Cards for Outlook Actionable Messages using Power Automate | Power Platform

Let’s take a look at how you can design Adaptive Cards for Outlook and get response from Outlook users to process using Power Automate.

Scenario

Let’s say I wanted to send an Adaptive Card to an Outlook user on their Email and ask some comment, example – A descriptive feedback and read their response back and send them a confirmation Adaptive Card.

In this post, I’ll simply read the Response in the Flow and send a Confirmation-like Adaptive Card so that you can then further decide to take required action for it based on your use case.

Adaptive Cards Designer – Initial Card Layout

You can logon to https://adaptivecards.io/designer/ i.e. the Adaptive Card designer and start building your card. Below are the high-level steps:

  1. Once you are in the Adaptive Cards Designer, make sure you select the host app as “Outlook Actionable Messages

    You’ll see a sample already created for you which you can start working off of –

  2. Since I want to start from the beginning, I’ll select New Card option as shown below

  3. Now, I’ll start to design my card with the use of some TextBlock, an Input.Text to capture a response. In your case, you can choose the type of input(s) you want. (I’m trying to keep it simple for now 😊)
    These controls works like a drag-and-drop behavior, just drop whatever you need.


    So, I did the following, I added a TextBlock to add the title I want to show on the card and a Multi-line Input.Text to capture a response of the user I’ll send the card to in their Email.

  4. For the Input.Text, I’ve added an id ‘answer‘. We’ll need this when we capture responses back.
    Also, to make the Input.Text control as multi-line, Multi-Line option should be selected as I did below

  5. At this point, our Adaptive Card’s layout is ready. Before we proceed we must first, create a Flow that will capture an HTTP Response and then we’ll come back here.

Flow to Capture Response

Adaptive Cards for Outlook Actionable Messages work off of the HTTP mechanism and that’s why you need a URL where you can capture the responses and send back a confirmation response back.

Let’s call this Flow as “Accept Feedback Response

  1. To do so, first create a Flow that Accepts an HTTP Request. You can refer my other post in order to understand how you can capture HTTP Responses – Accept HTTP Requests in a Flow and send Response back | Power Automate
    Once once you save a Flow that has a trigger of HTTP Response, you’ll get a URL generated, copy it.

  2. Next, I’ll enter the schema by clicking on Use sample payload to generate schema button on the first step above and enter the following schema since I know that’s what is to be expected from the User when they fill in the Text and submit back.

  3. Once you click OK, your schema will look like this.

  4. Collect the result of the above trigger in the Compose so that you can save the Flow with at least 1 Action. (We’ll come back to it later)

  5. Next up, we will also need to setup a response Adaptive Card. This is something that the users will see when they Submit their responses.

  6. It is mandatory to send the response back to the caller i.e. the Outlook in this case. Hence, we’ll send a Response back using Response action in HTTP and send the status code as 200 and header CARD-UPDATE-IN-BODY as true.
    The Body will have the Adaptive Card which we created in step #5 above i.e. the Adaptive Card we have to send as confirmation.

    Here are the details of Refreshing Cards when you send back a response to the client (Outlook user in this case): https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook/actionable-messages/adaptive-card#refresh-cards?WT.mc_id=DX-MVP-5003911

Complete your Adaptive Card – Add Action

Once your Flow to capture the response is ready, let’s complete the Adaptive Card to add an Action to the same.

  1. Select the card body, you’ll see a button to Add an action

    You’ll need to select Action.Http

  2. Once you select the Action.Http type of Action, look at the Element Properties, you’ll need to enter the URL we got from the Flow we created to capture responses above.

    Here why we chose Action.Http – https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook/actionable-messages/adaptive-card#outlook-specific-adaptive-card-properties-and-features?WT.mc_id=DX-MVP-5003911
  3. Next, set the title of the Action (it appears as a button). I’ll name it Submit.
    Also, select what kind of Method is to be used for the HTTP Request.

  4. Now, since you’ve selected POST method, you will need to pass the Body. This will be the response which the user will send and which the Flow above will read it as a Response to process the information further.
    Once you select POST, a Body element property will be added where you need to enter the schema and what ID of the element that information belongs to

  5. Remember, the ID for the Input.Text was set as “answer”, we’ll put that here and then it’s Value property. These values should be enclosed in double curly brackets {{ }}.


  6. And also, you’ll need to pass along the Header for Authorization. Read this post by Microsoft – https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook/actionable-messages/security-requirements#action-authorization-header?WT.mc_id=DX-MVP-5003911
    Add Header as shown below

    Now, as mentioned in the above post, we need to pass the property as Authorization header and leave it blank and Content-Type as application/json

  7. Once all this is done, it’ll look like below in the card payload for the Action.Http part.

  8. Now copy the entire Payload from the Editor and we’ll create a new Flow that will be used to send the Adaptive Card to the user.

Flow to Send the Adaptive Card in Email

I’m creating a Flow here which will be used to send the Adaptive Card. To keep it simple, I’m just triggering it using a button on-demand. Your use-case will vary.

Let’s call this Flow as “Send Feedback Request

  1. Wherever you need to create the Adaptive Card, you’ll need to paste the entire Payload copied from the step above in a Compose step

  2. I’ll add a step to send an Email directly using Send Email and make sure you enable the </> part for the body.


    Make sure the Outputs of the Compose we pasted above in Step #2 are enclosed in
    <script type="application/adaptivecard+json">
    </script>

Working

Let’s look at how this will turn out!!

  1. Let me just Run the Flow as is so that the Adaptive Card is generated and sent to the user I intend to in the Email.
  2. They’ll receive an email like this

  3. And the user will submit the answer in the text box and submit.

  4. Once they submit, the Accept Feedback Response Flow we created will be triggered

  5. And the response is available to be read and processed further in the Compose step we created to collect it with the defined schema.


  6. The Adaptive Card we had created to send back as confirmation (which looks as below) will be sent

  7. Once the user submits, they’ll get the below Adaptive Card as a confirmation that their feedback has been taken.

And that’s how you can make your Adaptive Cards to function with Outlook!! Hope this was helpful.

Here are some superb posts on Adaptive Cards –

  1. Microsoft Message Cards – The Ultimate Guide by Thomas Poszytek – https://poszytek.eu/en/microsoft-en/microsoft-message-cards-the-ultimate-guide/
  2. Multi line Approvals with Adaptive Cards, Outlook and Power Automate by Yash Agarwal – https://www.bythedevs.com/post/multi-line-approvals-with-adaptive-cards-outlook-and-power-automate
  3. Custom Actionable Messages with Microsoft Flow series by Rik-de Koning (3 posts) – https://www.about365.nl/category/blog-series/custom-actionable-messages-with-microsoft-flow/

Here are some more Power Automate / Adaptive Cards posts you might want to look at –

  1. Adaptive Cards for Teams to collect data from users using Power Automate | SharePoint Lists
  2. Task Completion reminder using Flow Bot in Microsoft Teams | Power Automate
  3. Make On-Demand Flow to show up in Dynamics 365 | Power Automate
  4. Run As context in CDS (Current Environment) Flow Trigger | Power Automate
  5. Using triggerBody() / triggerOutput() to read CDS trigger metadata attributes in a Flow | Power Automate
  6. Terminate a Flow with Failed/Cancelled status | Power Automate
  7. Call HTTP Request from a Canvas Power App using Flow and get back Response | Power Automate
  8. Setting Retry Policy for an HTTP request in a Flow | Power Automate
  9. Send a Power App Push Notification using Flow to open a record in Canvas App | Power Automate
  10. ChildFlowUnsupportedForInvokerConnections error while using Child Flows [SOLVED] | Power Automate
  11. BPF Flow Step as a Trigger in CDS (Current Environment) connector | Power Automate
  12. Pause a Flow using Delay and Delay Until | Power Automate

Thank you!! 😊

Find deprecated JS code used in your Dynamics 365 environment | Dynamics 365 v9 JS Validator tool | XrmToolBox

In this point in time where all developers are busy upgrading their Dynamics 365 JavaScript libraries to use the latest supported code.

Here’s an extremely handy tool by Michel Gueli (https://twitter.com/MichelGueli) called as ‘XrmToolBox.Dynamics365V9JavascriptValidator’

Dynamics 365 v9 JavaScript Validator in XrmToolBox

If you use XrmToolBox already, make sure you look for the below tool

  1. In Tool Library, search for Dynamics 365 JavaScript Validator and you’ll find this tool already.

  2. Once you find it, it’s pretty easy to use it.
    You’ll find it in the list of your tools as below



    Then, it’ll just Retrieve all the Resources first. This will take a minute or two depending on your environment.

  3. Once done, it’s best practice to already add all the code you want to analyze in 1 solution in your Dynamics 365 environment like so

  4. Now, in the tool , open the same solution so that you only focus on the JS files you need to work with.

  5. Once you open it up, you’ll find all you files listed below. Just double click one of them and you’ll find what all needs to be changed.

  6. Once you work your way up in the file by replacing the deprecated code, you can reload the solution again and find that there are no longer any warnings like on my other file below

NuGet Gallery Link: https://www.nuget.org/packages/XrmToolBox.Dynamics365V9JavascriptValidator/

Hope this was useful!!
In case you are looking for more XrmToolBox or Dynamics 365 related posts, please check below –

  1. Set Lookups in Xrm.WebApi D365 v9 correctly. Solving ‘Undeclared Property’ error
  2. Find Created On date of solution components in Solution Layers | Dynamics 365 [Quick Tip]
  3. Pass data to HTML Web Resource using browser’s sessionStorage in Dynamics 365 CE
  4. Pass Execution Context to JS Script function as a parameter from a Ribbon button in Dynamics 365 | Ribbon Workbench
  5. Get GUID of the current View in Dynamics 365 CRM JS from ribbon button | Ribbon Workbench
  6. Import lookup referencing records together in Dynamics 365 CRM | [Linking related entity data during Excel Import]
  7. Mailbox Alerts Hide/Show behavior in Dynamics 365 CRM
  8. Enable/Disable the need to Approve Email for Mailboxes in Dynamics 365 CRM CE
  9. Debug Ribbon button customization using Command Checker in Dynamics 365 CE Unified Interface
  10. Get Dynamics 365 field metadata in a Canvas App using DataSourceInfo function | Common Data Service

Thank you!!

Make On-Demand Flow to show up in Dynamics 365 | Power Automate

Here’s a Flow trigger that you can make to appear on-demand in Dynamics 365 views. What makes a Flow appear on a certain entity?

Like this –

Common Data Service connector (Not Current Environment version)

If you’re familiar by now with Common Data Service Connectors, there are 2 of them. 1. Common Data Service, 2. Common Data Service (Current Environment).

  1. Here, you’ll have to use the 1st one i.e. Common Data Service connector. If you type Common Data Service in triggers, both will appear but you have to hover on these and make sure you don’t select the one with Current Environment written on it.

  2. Once you select this, you can select this trigger in order to make it on demand in Dynamics 365.

  3. Now, it appears like any other Flow trigger. Optionally, you can add some inputs in case you want to.
    In my example, I’m taking in a field value called as “Common Comments” and will just update the Description field of the selected Accounts for simplicity of this example.

    Because I want it on Accounts entity views, I’ll select entity Account.


  4. Now, my Flow looks like this. That’s it.


  5. To keep things simple, I’ll just update the record with whatever I put in the Common Comments Input variable in my Flow trigger.

    Now let’s see it work.

On-Demand Flow

Now, in Dynamics 365, I’ll navigate to Accounts entity and select a few records.

  1. Once I select a few records and check the Flows dropdown from the ribbon menu –



  2. If I run this flow, I’ll get option to put my Input parameters as I have declared above.

  3. Since I had selected 2 records, there’ll be two separate instances (Flow Runs) triggered for this Flow

  4. And I can see the values updated in the records. (Checking using Advanced Find)

    That’s it!!

Hope this was useful.

Here are some more Power Automate / Flow posts you might want to look at-

  1. Run As context in CDS (Current Environment) Flow Trigger | Power Automate
  2. Secure Input/Output in Power Automate Run History
  3. Task Completion reminder using Flow Bot in Microsoft Teams | Power Automate
  4. Using triggerBody() / triggerOutput() to read CDS trigger metadata attributes in a Flow | Power Automate
  5. Call HTTP Request from a Canvas Power App using Flow and get back Response | Power Automate
  6. Send a Power App Push Notification using Flow to open a record in Canvas App | Power Automate
  7. Accept HTTP Requests in a Flow and send Response back | Power Automate
  8. Terminate a Flow with Failed/Cancelled status | Power Automate
  9. Pause a Flow using Delay and Delay Until | Power Automate
  10. Generate Dynamics 365 record link in a Flow using CDS connector | Power Automate

Thank you!!

Track and Set Regarding are disabled for Appointments in Dynamics 365 App For Outlook message | Demystified

If you are new to tracking, you probably also want to track the Appointments to Dynamics as well.

Whether this is enabled for you or not is an optional setting and you end up seeing this error message –

Enable Tracking for Appointments, Tasks & Contacts

  1. One of the first places to go and check for Admins when someone reports such an issue is to check if the Appointments, Contacts or Tasks are enabled in Dynamics 365 Outlook or not.

    If you want to navigate to Dynamics 365 App directly and don’t seem to find it in your SiteMap, check this post – Dynamics 365 App For Outlook missing on SiteMap in CRM? Use shortcut link [Quick Tip]
  2. Now that you know the Dynamics 365 App For Outlook is not abled for Appointments, Contacts and Tasks, next, you’ll need to go to Settings > Email Configuration > Mailboxes and switch view to show Active Mailboxes as My Active Mailboxes is usually set to Default.
    Look for the user’s mailbox –
    You’ll find that the Appointments, Contacts and Tasks are not Enabled for Server-Side Synchronization

  3. Enable this and Test & Enable the mailbox

    In case you are also looking to enable Server-Side Sync in general to enable Dynamics 365 App For Outlook, check this post – Summarizing D365 App For Outlook Setup in 3 steps with Exchange Online mailbox

  4. Check this if it should only be enabled for the current Org.

  5. Once the Test is successful, it should now be enabled in Dynamics 365 App For Outlook Settings as well.

  6. Refresh the browser once if you are using Outlook Web App, you should be able to also track Appointments/Contacts/Tasks to Dynamics 365

  7. Now, the meeting invite should be available to track.

    Please note that even if you click on Track, the meeting will only be tracked once you send it out.


    Hope this helps! Here are some more Dynamics 365 posts you might want to check –
  1. Cancelled Bookings Imported in Time Entries in Dynamics 365 PSA issue | [Quick Tip]
  2. Remove ‘This Email has been blocked due to potentially harmful content.’ message in Dynamics 365 Emails | OrgDbSettings utility
  3. Get GUID of the current View in Dynamics 365 CRM JS from ribbon button | Ribbon Workbench
  4. Get Dynamics 365 field metadata in a Canvas App using DataSourceInfo function | Common Data Service
  5. Dynamics 365 App For Outlook missing on SiteMap in CRM? Use shortcut link [Quick Tip]
  6. Pass Execution Context to JS Script function as a parameter from a Ribbon button in Dynamics 365 | Ribbon Workbench
  7. Find Created On date of solution components in Solution Layers | Dynamics 365 [Quick Tip]
  8. Add multiple Opportunity Products at once in Dynamics 365 Sales | Enhanced Experience [Preview]
  9. Import lookup referencing records together in Dynamics 365 CRM | [Linking related entity data during Excel Import]
  10. Pass data to HTML Web Resource using browser’s sessionStorage in Dynamics 365 CE

Thank you!!

Run As context in CDS (Current Environment) Flow Trigger | Power Automate

In a CDS (Current Environment), you have to option to Run the Flow under a context of a certain user. And there are a few options from which you can select from – Process Owner, Record Owner & Triggering User

Here’s my Flow in which the trigger is the CDS (Current Environment) connector. Show advanced options and you’ll see that there’s a field call as Run As


Which has the following 3 Options as I mentioned above –

Let’s look at each one of these.

Scenario

To demonstrate Run As, my Flow is triggering on the Update of the Account record, an attribute in the CDS (Current Environment) connector called as RunAsSystemUserId provides the GUID of the System User used in the connector’s Run As field.

You can use triggerOutputs() function to get this GUID from the Trigger Outputs and use it to fetch the System User record. To see how triggerOutputs/triggerBody() works, check this post – Using triggerBody() / triggerOutput() to read CDS trigger metadata attributes in a Flow | Power Automate

Process Owner

As suggested, Flow Owner meaning the one who Owns the Flow

  1. If I select as Process Owner, no matter who triggers the Flow or who is the Owner of the record, the Run As user will be the one who Owns the Flow.


    The record could belong to one owner and the other owner might modify it as shown below –



    But the Flow will Run As the Owner of the Flow as suggested.




    Multiple Owners?
    In my test, I believe the one who created the Flow becomes the first Owner and hence, is what it appears in Run As

Record Owner

  1. Easily, the record Owner in Dynamics 365 is the Owner of the record, so no matter who triggered the Flow or who the Flow owner is, the Record Owner will be the Run As user.

  2. In this example, Priyesh Wagh is modifying the record Owner by Kuldeep Gupta, the Flow Run As will show as Kuldeep Gupta

Triggering User [Also Default]

  1. If the Run As is set to Triggering User, whoever caused the Flow to Run is the Run As context user.


    Let’s say Kuldeep Gupta is a user is modifying a record Owned by SYSTEM, the Run As user is Kuldeep Gupta.




  2. Now, if there’s no Run As selected or even if there are multiple Owners to the same Flow, the one who causes the Flow to run, is the context user of the Flow.


    Let’s say Priyesh Wagh modified this record owned by SYSTEM, the Flow will Run As Priyesh Wagh


Hope this helps!!

Here are some more Power Automate related posts you might want to look at –

  1. Task Completion reminder using Flow Bot in Microsoft Teams | Power Automate
  2. Call HTTP Request from a Canvas Power App using Flow and get back Response | Power Automate
  3. Send a Power App Push Notification using Flow to open a record in Canvas App | Power Automate
  4. Accept HTTP Requests in a Flow and send Response back | Power Automate
  5. Terminate a Flow with Failed/Cancelled status | Power Automate
  6. ChildFlowUnsupportedForInvokerConnections error while using Child Flows [SOLVED] | Power Automate
  7. BPF Flow Step as a Trigger in CDS (Current Environment) connector | Power Automate
  8. Pause a Flow using Delay and Delay Until | Power Automate
  9. Generate Dynamics 365 record link in a Flow using CDS connector | Power Automate
  10. Setting Retry Policy for an HTTP request in a Flow | Power Automate
  11. Text Functions in a Flow | Power Automate
  12. Using Parse JSON to read individual List Records in Flow|Power Automate

Thank you!!

Cancelled Bookings Imported in Time Entries in Dynamics 365 PSA issue | [Quick Tip]

Import Bookings is one of the important features provided by PSA for users to do Time Entries quickly and efficiently!

But out of the box, they also Import Cancelled Bookings!

Scenario

Now, let’s say we have some Bookings for a Resource and they look like this-

  1. These are the original Bookings for Priyesh on Tuesday and Thursday respectively i.e. 27th and 29th Oct 2020.

  2. Now, let’s cancel the 27th Oct 2020 booking. You can do so by right-clicking and changing the Status to Canceled. Once done, it will look like below –

  3. By default, when Priyesh tries the use the Import Bookings feature in Time Entries, he sees the below Canceled Booking as well.
    It can happen that the one who imports doesn’t recollect about the Canceled Booking and might Import it by mistake.


    To solve this, here’s what we do!

Resource Bookings for Time Entry Import view

So, here’s the view you care for.

  1. Open the Resource Bookings for Time Entry Import view as shown below

  2. In this view, change the Criteria

    The default criteria will look like below –
  3. Add another condition to it on top level i.e. the Booking Resource Booking entity itself for Booking Status field.


    Add this condition

    This should be it. Save and Publish your changes.

Correct Bookings Imported

With that small change, Canceled Bookings will not be imported for Time Entries.

Hope this helps!

Here are some more Dynamics 365 PSA (Project Service Automation) related posts you might want to look at –

  1. Change Booking Status colors on Schedule Board for Field Service/PSA [Quick Tip]
  2. Modify Project tab’s view in Schedule Board in PSA v3 | Quick Tip
  3. Dynamics 365 PSA v2 to v3 Upgrade failed? Here’s what to do.
  4. Additional columns in PSA v3 Schedule view
  5. Update Price feature in D365 PSA v3
  6. A manager is required for non-project time entries, absence, and vacation error in D365 PSA v3
  7. Set Work Hours Template to a Bookable Resource in D365 PSA v3
  8. Booking Resources more than their capacity in D365 PSA v3
  9. Time/Expense Entry Rejection comments in D365 PSA v3
  10. PSA v3 View Custom Controls used on Project form

Thank you!