Enable Managed Environments in Power Platform Admin Center

Here’s what Managed Environments do! They provide more control on how you administer the Environments i.e. by limiting App Sharing, applying Data Policies on the environment and even how Solution Checker should allow to import solutions upon detecting critical issues (Solution Checker feature for Managed Environments is in Preview at the time of writing this post!).

Below is the snipped from Microsoft Learn Document highlighting the capabilities of Managed Environments



Further, as I explore these features more, I’ll update and add links to the posts explaining each of the features in details.

Enable Managed Environments in Power Platform Admin Center

Given that you have appropriate permissions to take administrative actions on Power Platform environments, you can navigate to Power Platform Admin Center and then in Environments (https://admin.powerplatform.microsoft.com/environments) –

  1. Select an Environment and click on the ellipses on the menu.

  2. Once you select the same, review the License implications as highlighted below –
    Here’s the Microsoft Documentation on the same – https://learn.microsoft.com/en-gb/power-platform/admin/managed-environment-licensing?WT.mc_id=ppac_inproduct_env%3FWT.mc_id%3DDX-MVP-5003911

  3. Once you review the below preferences on how you want this environment to be managed, you can select the same and click on Enable as seen below –
    These will send insights in email. I’ll cover in a separate post and link here.


  4. Once everything looks good, you can Enable.

Editing Managed Environments / Disabling

Here’s how you can edit or disable Managed Environments –

  1. If you are seeing Edit Managed Environments, it means that Managed Environment is enabled for that environment.

  2. And you can disable Management Environment control using PowerShell. You can check this post which highlights how you can do so – https://learn.microsoft.com/en-gb/power-platform/admin/managed-environment-enable#disable-managed-environments-using-powershell?WT.mc_id=DX-MVP-5003911
    Snapshot of the document below –

Here’s Microsoft Learn documentation on Managed Environments – https://learn.microsoft.com/en-gb/power-platform/admin/managed-environment-overview?WT.mc_id=DX-MVP-5003911

Hope this helps!

Here are some Power Automate posts you want to check out –

  1. Select the item based on a key value using Filter Array in Power Automate
  2. Select values from an array using Select action in a Power Automate Flow
  3. Blocking Attachment Extensions in Dynamics 365 CRM
  4. Upgrade Dataverse for Teams Environment to Dataverse Environment
  5. Showing Sandbox or Non Production Apps in Power App mobile app
  6. Create a Power Apps Per User Plan Trial | Dataverse environment
  7. Install On-Premise Gateway from Power Automate or Power Apps | Power Platform
  8. Co-presence in Power Automate | Multiple users working on a Flow
  9. Search Rows (preview) Action in Dataverse connector in a Flow | Power Automate
  10. Suppress Workflow Header Information while sending back HTTP Response in a Flow | Power Automate
  11. Call a Flow from Canvas Power App and get back response | Power Platform\
  12. FetchXML Aggregation in a Flow using CDS (Current Environment) connector | Power Automate
  13. Parsing Outputs of a List Rows action using Parse JSON in a Flow | Common Data Service (CE) connector
  14. Asynchronous HTTP Response from a Flow | Power Automate
  15. Validate JSON Schema for HTTP Request trigger in a Flow and send Response | Power Automate
  16. Converting JSON to XML and XML to JSON in a Flow | Power Automate

Thank you!

Advertisement

Power Platform self-service analytics Data Export to Data Lake [Preview] | Power Platform Admin Center

Now, you can also export the Analytics Data to Azure Data Lake in order to further extend the derive rich data analytics!
At the time of writing this post, this feature is in Preview (As you’ll also see from the screenshots below)

This is a great feature where you can extract this Data into Data Lake and then further enrich and derive rich Power BI reporting based on your use-case.

In case you are new to understanding Azure Data Lake and pricing, you can review this – https://azure.microsoft.com/en-gb/solutions/data-lake/?WT.mc_id=DX-MVP-5003911

Data Export (Preview)

In Power Platform Admin Center (https://admin.powerplatform.microsoft.com/), here’s how you can setup Data Export –

  1. Navigate to Data Export in Power Platform Admin Center given that you have appropriate rights –


  2. Then, you’ll get to choose amongst the Power Apps or Power Automate data to be exported to Data Lake.

  3. In this example, I’ll choose Power Automate. As I select Power Automate, you’ll see that Tenant-Level Analytics are required and hence, already considered as Yes. If not, you’ll need to Enable Tenant-Level Analytics while doing this step – Here’s another post on how to Enable and Use Tenant Level Analytics –


  4. Now, In the next section you’ll need to choose the Subscription.


  5. Further, select the Resource Group and eventually, the Storage Account as well.


    And Storage Account is selected as well.

  6. Once everything looks good, you can click on Create.

  7. In a few moments, this will appear in Data Lake section of the Data Export. It will take up to 24 hours for the data to first start showing in Data Lake.

  8. Once this is completed after about 24 hours, you’ll see the status of the Data Lake data package changed to connected.


Data Export to Data Lake

Let’s look at the Azure Storage Explorer to connect to our Data Lake and see the Power Platform data – In case you are looking to install Azure Storage Explorer, here’s a post – Microsoft Azure Storage Explorer | Getting Started

  1. Once authenticated to the correct environment in Azure Storage Explorer, here’s what you would see in the ADLS Gen 2 (In case you want to create ADLS Gen 2 storage account, you can review this post – Create ADLS Gen 2 Storage Account for Azure Data Lake)
    You’ll see powerplatform folder show up.

  2. If you open this folder, since we had chosen Power Automate, it’s folder will be created.

  3. And let’s go in Flows folder to see the data. You’ll find json files of the same. You can double click to open it and it’ll open in whatever editor you have installed.

  4. In this case, I had VS Code, so here’s what the Flow data looks like –

  5. Likewise, you can dig deeper in this data and use this further for your reporting!

Here’s Microsoft Learn Document on the same – https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/power-platform/admin/self-service-analytics?WT.mc_id=DX-MVP-5003911

Here’s Microsoft Learn Docs for Tenant-Level Analytics – https://learn.microsoft.com/en-gb/power-platform/admin/tenant-level-analytics#how-do-i-enable-tenant-level-analytics?WT.mc_id=DX-MVP-5003911

Hope this helps!

Here are some Power Automate posts you want to check out –

  1. Select the item based on a key value using Filter Array in Power Automate
  2. Select values from an array using Select action in a Power Automate Flow
  3. Blocking Attachment Extensions in Dynamics 365 CRM
  4. Upgrade Dataverse for Teams Environment to Dataverse Environment
  5. Showing Sandbox or Non Production Apps in Power App mobile app
  6. Create a Power Apps Per User Plan Trial | Dataverse environment
  7. Install On-Premise Gateway from Power Automate or Power Apps | Power Platform
  8. Co-presence in Power Automate | Multiple users working on a Flow
  9. Search Rows (preview) Action in Dataverse connector in a Flow | Power Automate
  10. Suppress Workflow Header Information while sending back HTTP Response in a Flow | Power Automate
  11. Call a Flow from Canvas Power App and get back response | Power Platform\
  12. FetchXML Aggregation in a Flow using CDS (Current Environment) connector | Power Automate
  13. Parsing Outputs of a List Rows action using Parse JSON in a Flow | Common Data Service (CE) connector
  14. Asynchronous HTTP Response from a Flow | Power Automate
  15. Validate JSON Schema for HTTP Request trigger in a Flow and send Response | Power Automate
  16. Converting JSON to XML and XML to JSON in a Flow | Power Automate

Thank you!

Tenant-Level Analytics in Power Platform Admin Center | For Power Apps and Power Automate

As your organization and tenant usage grows, it’s difficult to keep track of Adoption. To tackle this, Tenant-Level Analytics have been introduced in Power Platform Admin Center (https://admin.powerplatform.microsoft.com/).

Let’s see how we can turn this on for your tenant!

Enable Tenant-Level Analytics

Given that you have appropriate permissions in Power Platform Admin Center, here’s how you can enable Tenant-Level Analytics –

  1. In Power Platform Admin Center, look for Settings area – under this, you’ll see an option called as Analytics

  2. Once you select Analytics, you’ll see on the right-hand side, a simple switch to turn it On. it could be Off by default.

  3. Once you Turn if On and Save, you’ll also see a confirmation message.


    And it’ll show this message once applied.

  4. Now, do a complete Broswer refresh.


Reading Tenant-Level Analytics

Here’s how you can review tenant-level analytics once enabled for your Tenant via the Power Platform Admin Center –

  1. When Tenant-Level Analytics are disabled, you’ll not find anything on the top right corner of the Analytics under Power Automate or Power Apps

    Tenant-Level Analytics: OFF (for both, Power Automate and Power Apps)


    Tenant-Level Analytics: ON


  2. You can drop down on the menu and find Tenant-Level Analytics.

  3. Once you choose Tenant level analysis, you’ll see the below report show up – this is the same for Power Automate as well as Power Apps.
    Please note that it takes up to 24 to 48 hours for the metrics to start showing from the previous day.


  4. And after approx. 48 hours later, I see this data now showing up.

Here’s Microsoft Learn Docs for Tenant-Level Analytics – https://learn.microsoft.com/en-gb/power-platform/admin/tenant-level-analytics#how-do-i-enable-tenant-level-analytics?WT.mc_id=DX-MVP-5003911

Hope this helps!

Here are some Power Automate posts you want to check out –

  1. Select the item based on a key value using Filter Array in Power Automate
  2. Select values from an array using Select action in a Power Automate Flow
  3. Blocking Attachment Extensions in Dynamics 365 CRM
  4. Upgrade Dataverse for Teams Environment to Dataverse Environment
  5. Showing Sandbox or Non Production Apps in Power App mobile app
  6. Create a Power Apps Per User Plan Trial | Dataverse environment
  7. Install On-Premise Gateway from Power Automate or Power Apps | Power Platform
  8. Co-presence in Power Automate | Multiple users working on a Flow
  9. Search Rows (preview) Action in Dataverse connector in a Flow | Power Automate
  10. Suppress Workflow Header Information while sending back HTTP Response in a Flow | Power Automate
  11. Call a Flow from Canvas Power App and get back response | Power Platform\
  12. FetchXML Aggregation in a Flow using CDS (Current Environment) connector | Power Automate
  13. Parsing Outputs of a List Rows action using Parse JSON in a Flow | Common Data Service (CE) connector
  14. Asynchronous HTTP Response from a Flow | Power Automate
  15. Validate JSON Schema for HTTP Request trigger in a Flow and send Response | Power Automate
  16. Converting JSON to XML and XML to JSON in a Flow | Power Automate

Thank you!

Microsoft Azure Storage Explorer | Getting Started

If you are wondering how to get and setup the Microsoft Azure Storage Explorer – Here’s this post!

Azure Storage Explorer

Here’s how you can download and setup Microsoft Azure Storage Explorer.

  1. Search For Azure Storage Explorer and you’ll see something as below –

  2. Once you open the azure.microsoft.com link, you’ll see the below –
    Drop down to select Windows. And the Setup will will be prompted to save on your browser (or directly download based on your browser settings)

  3. And it’ll appear that it has been downloaded to your machine.

  4. Now, click on the Setup and let it start. Accept the Terms if everything looks OK to you, then click on Install


  5. It’ll then ask you where to setup and what it should call on the system. Standard stuff.



  6. Then, installation will begin.


  7. Then, open it up when finished.

  8. Now, this will come up. You are now ready to Sign-In!

Sign In with Azure in Microsoft Storage Explorer

Now, picking up from the step above, here’s how you sign in –

  1. Click on the Sign In with Azure if that’s your case unless you are trying other options in this wizard.

  2. If your Azure is usual one to login, can you simply click on Azure and click Next.


  3. Then, you’ll be asked to authenticate. Enter your credentials and authenticate like you would for any Microsoft Account.

  4. Once successful, you’ll see this and you can close the window.

  5. Now, if you open the App, it’ll detect your Azure Subscription if you have one.
    If it looks correct, you can simply click on Open Explorer.

  6. Once opened, you can expand on the Subscription and see all your Storage Accounts.

Hope this helps!

Here are some Power Automate posts you want to check out –

  1. Smart Buttons in Ribbon Workbench | XrmToolBox
  2. Hide options from OptionSet using JavaScript in Dynamics 365 CRM
  3. Select the item based on a key value using Filter Array in Power Automate
  4. Select values from an array using Select action in a Power Automate Flow
  5. Blocking Attachment Extensions in Dynamics 365 CRM
  6. Upgrade Dataverse for Teams Environment to Dataverse Environment
  7. Showing Sandbox or Non Production Apps in Power App mobile app
  8. Create a Power Apps Per User Plan Trial | Dataverse environment
  9. Install On-Premise Gateway from Power Automate or Power Apps | Power Platform
  10. Co-presence in Power Automate | Multiple users working on a Flow
  11. Search Rows (preview) Action in Dataverse connector in a Flow | Power Automate
  12. Suppress Workflow Header Information while sending back HTTP Response in a Flow | Power Automate
  13. Call a Flow from Canvas Power App and get back response | Power Platform
  14. FetchXML Aggregation in a Flow using CDS (Current Environment) connector | Power Automate
  15. Parsing Outputs of a List Rows action using Parse JSON in a Flow | Common Data Service (CE) connector
  16. Asynchronous HTTP Response from a Flow | Power Automate
  17. Validate JSON Schema for HTTP Request trigger in a Flow and send Response | Power Automate
  18. Converting JSON to XML and XML to JSON in a Flow | Power Automate

Thank you!

Tracked Properties in Power Automate Flow Step

If you are new to Power Automate and are wondering how Tracked Properties are and how they work?

Tracked Properties are data properties which are hidden away from the Input/Output sections of the Flow and which you can explicitly retrieve in a Flow Run.

Here’s a post to explain the same!

Tracked Properties

Below are what Tracked Properties are –

  1. If you look at the Settings section of different Actions, you’ll see Tracked Properties.

  2. And you’ll see Tracked Properties at the bottom once all Action specific Settings are listed.

  3. Here, you can create and store your own properties and it’s value. It’s value could also be results of preceding steps or from expressions.
    See example below –

  4. Once you create these Properties, here’s how you can retrieve the same.

Retrieving Tracked Properties

Here’s how you can retrieve Tracked Properties –

  1. You need to address using actions() method in Power Automate to read Tracked Properties of a certain step.
    Hence, the syntax is “action('<stepname>')?['TrackedProperties']

  2. You can store it in an Object variable and see the result as below

  3. Or, if you want to retrieve only a specific property, you can mention the same in the expressions itself.


  4. And it’ll show up like this (In anything stores Integer / String)

Hope this helps!

Here are some Power Automate posts you want to check out –

  1. Smart Buttons in Ribbon Workbench | XrmToolBox
  2. Hide options from OptionSet using JavaScript in Dynamics 365 CRM
  3. Select the item based on a key value using Filter Array in Power Automate
  4. Select values from an array using Select action in a Power Automate Flow
  5. Blocking Attachment Extensions in Dynamics 365 CRM
  6. Upgrade Dataverse for Teams Environment to Dataverse Environment
  7. Showing Sandbox or Non Production Apps in Power App mobile app
  8. Create a Power Apps Per User Plan Trial | Dataverse environment
  9. Install On-Premise Gateway from Power Automate or Power Apps | Power Platform
  10. Co-presence in Power Automate | Multiple users working on a Flow
  11. Search Rows (preview) Action in Dataverse connector in a Flow | Power Automate
  12. Suppress Workflow Header Information while sending back HTTP Response in a Flow | Power Automate
  13. Call a Flow from Canvas Power App and get back response | Power Platform
  14. FetchXML Aggregation in a Flow using CDS (Current Environment) connector | Power Automate
  15. Parsing Outputs of a List Rows action using Parse JSON in a Flow | Common Data Service (CE) connector
  16. Asynchronous HTTP Response from a Flow | Power Automate
  17. Validate JSON Schema for HTTP Request trigger in a Flow and send Response | Power Automate
  18. Converting JSON to XML and XML to JSON in a Flow | Power Automate

Thank you!

Smart Buttons in Ribbon Workbench | XrmToolBox

You must’ve definitely used Scott Durow’s Ribbon Workbench in XrmToolBox which is one of the most popular tools for in the XrmToolBox. Here’s what Smart Buttons can do to further extend capabilities of the Ribbon!



Let’s see how you can install Smart Buttons if you already have not installed the solution in your environment and also I’ll summarize how each of these will work! Hope this post captures the bare-minimum well.

Installing Smart Buttons

Here’s how you can install the Smart Buttons solution to make it appear in your Ribbon Workbench!
Link: Install Smart Buttons for Ribbon Workbench | XrmToolBox

Smart Button Posts

  1. Run Reporthttps://d365demystified.com/2023/01/17/run-report-using-smart-button-in-ribbon-workbench-xrmtoolbox/
  2. Run Workflow https://d365demystified.com/2023/01/17/run-workflow-smart-button-in-ribbon-workbench-xrmtoolbox/
  3. Run Webhookhttps://d365demystified.com/2023/01/17/run-webhook-smart-button-in-ribbon-workbench-xrmtoolbox/
  4. Quick JS https://d365demystified.com/2023/01/17/run-js-snippet-using-smart-button-in-ribbon-workbench-xrmtoolbox/
  5. Open Dialoghttps://d365demystified.com/2023/01/17/open-dialog-using-smart-button-in-ribbon-workbench-xrmtoolbox/

Hope this helps!

Here are some Power Automate posts you want to check out –

  1. Select the item based on a key value using Filter Array in Power Automate
  2. Select values from an array using Select action in a Power Automate Flow
  3. Blocking Attachment Extensions in Dynamics 365 CRM
  4. Upgrade Dataverse for Teams Environment to Dataverse Environment
  5. Showing Sandbox or Non Production Apps in Power App mobile app
  6. Create a Power Apps Per User Plan Trial | Dataverse environment
  7. Install On-Premise Gateway from Power Automate or Power Apps | Power Platform
  8. Co-presence in Power Automate | Multiple users working on a Flow
  9. Search Rows (preview) Action in Dataverse connector in a Flow | Power Automate
  10. Suppress Workflow Header Information while sending back HTTP Response in a Flow | Power Automate
  11. Call a Flow from Canvas Power App and get back response | Power Platform\
  12. FetchXML Aggregation in a Flow using CDS (Current Environment) connector | Power Automate
  13. Parsing Outputs of a List Rows action using Parse JSON in a Flow | Common Data Service (CE) connector
  14. Asynchronous HTTP Response from a Flow | Power Automate
  15. Validate JSON Schema for HTTP Request trigger in a Flow and send Response | Power Automate
  16. Converting JSON to XML and XML to JSON in a Flow | Power Automate

Thank you!

Open Dialog using Smart Button in Ribbon Workbench | XrmToolBox

Here’s how you can use Dialog from Smart Buttons in Ribbon Workbench. In case you haven’t yet installed Smart Buttons in your Ribbon Workbench for your organization – Here’s a post for that – Install Smart Buttons for Ribbon Workbench | XrmToolBox

Now that it’s given you might have installed Smart Buttons already, let’s review how you can use the Run Report button for your Organization

Scenario

Run Dialog button

Here’s how you can open a Canvas App as a Dialog in a Model-Driven App –

  1. In Ribbon Workbench, you can see the Open Dialog option in the Smart Buttons menu in Ribbon Workbench.

  2. Upon Dragging it to the ribbon (I’m using the Form ribbon in this example), you’ll be asked the below in a Dialog box.
    Title should have the title which the button should show on the ribbon.
    Dialog URL or Custom Page Unique Name should have the URL or the name of the Custom Page you have in your Model-driven App (I’ll share links below on how to get both from the official source itself)
    Width and Height as suggests should be specified in pixel dimensions.
    Dialog Title should show how the Dialog Box should look like.

  3. Here’s how the Custom Page’s name is (make sure the Custom Page is also added to the Model-Driven App your ribbon is in)

  4. Below are the links for both – Canvas App and Custom Page which can be added in the Dialog.

    Links:
    Custom Page to be added to the Open Dialog button – https://www.develop1.net/public/post/2021/08/08/custom-page-dialog-smart-button
    Canvas App to be added to the Open Dialog button – https://www.develop1.net/public/post/2020/09/30/new-smart-button-custom-dialogs-in-model-driven-apps-using-canvas-apps
  5. Once this is done, it’ll appear on the ribbon and once you confirm, you can commit the changes by Publishing the customization.

  6. Once this is done, publish and let’s see how the customization will look.

Working

Now that the customization are published, you can see as below –

  1. Here’s the button on the Form ribbon I added to.

  2. When you click it, the dialog box will appear as below –

Hope this helps!

Here are some Power Automate posts you want to check out –

  1. Select the item based on a key value using Filter Array in Power Automate
  2. Select values from an array using Select action in a Power Automate Flow
  3. Blocking Attachment Extensions in Dynamics 365 CRM
  4. Upgrade Dataverse for Teams Environment to Dataverse Environment
  5. Showing Sandbox or Non Production Apps in Power App mobile app
  6. Create a Power Apps Per User Plan Trial | Dataverse environment
  7. Install On-Premise Gateway from Power Automate or Power Apps | Power Platform
  8. Co-presence in Power Automate | Multiple users working on a Flow
  9. Search Rows (preview) Action in Dataverse connector in a Flow | Power Automate
  10. Suppress Workflow Header Information while sending back HTTP Response in a Flow | Power Automate
  11. Call a Flow from Canvas Power App and get back response | Power Platform\
  12. FetchXML Aggregation in a Flow using CDS (Current Environment) connector | Power Automate
  13. Parsing Outputs of a List Rows action using Parse JSON in a Flow | Common Data Service (CE) connector
  14. Asynchronous HTTP Response from a Flow | Power Automate
  15. Validate JSON Schema for HTTP Request trigger in a Flow and send Response | Power Automate
  16. Converting JSON to XML and XML to JSON in a Flow | Power Automate

Thank you!

Run JS snippet using Smart Button in Ribbon Workbench | XrmToolBox

Here’s how you can call a piece of JavaScript code snippet from Smart Buttons in Ribbon Workbench. In case you haven’t yet installed Smart Buttons in your Ribbon Workbench for your organization – Here’s a post for that – Install Smart Buttons for Ribbon Workbench | XrmToolBox

Now that it’s given you might have installed Smart Buttons already, let’s review how you can use the Run Report button for your Organization

Quick JS

Here’s how you can run a small snippet of code when upon clicking the Ribbon button –

  1. Here’s the Smart Button you can use to run a snippet of JS code.

  2. When you drag the same on the ribbon (Form Ribbon in this case), you’ll be asked the below parameters – the Name of the button and the JS code you want to run.

  3. Once you’ve entered this, you can see the button show up. Finally, publish the changes and check on the actual record (or Grid based on where you have used this)

Working

Here’s how the button will act upon using Quick JS Smart Button –

  1. You can see that the button is now shown on the Form.
    I opened to Console in Dev Tools to show what the JS snippet will do (since in this example, it’s supposed to Log a message in the console).

Hope this helps!

Here are some Power Automate posts you want to check out –

  1. Select the item based on a key value using Filter Array in Power Automate
  2. Select values from an array using Select action in a Power Automate Flow
  3. Blocking Attachment Extensions in Dynamics 365 CRM
  4. Upgrade Dataverse for Teams Environment to Dataverse Environment
  5. Showing Sandbox or Non Production Apps in Power App mobile app
  6. Create a Power Apps Per User Plan Trial | Dataverse environment
  7. Install On-Premise Gateway from Power Automate or Power Apps | Power Platform
  8. Co-presence in Power Automate | Multiple users working on a Flow
  9. Search Rows (preview) Action in Dataverse connector in a Flow | Power Automate
  10. Suppress Workflow Header Information while sending back HTTP Response in a Flow | Power Automate
  11. Call a Flow from Canvas Power App and get back response | Power Platform\
  12. FetchXML Aggregation in a Flow using CDS (Current Environment) connector | Power Automate
  13. Parsing Outputs of a List Rows action using Parse JSON in a Flow | Common Data Service (CE) connector
  14. Asynchronous HTTP Response from a Flow | Power Automate
  15. Validate JSON Schema for HTTP Request trigger in a Flow and send Response | Power Automate
  16. Converting JSON to XML and XML to JSON in a Flow | Power Automate

Thank you!

Run Webhook Smart Button in Ribbon Workbench | XrmToolBox

You can even Run Webhooks from the ribbon button in Dynamics 365 CRM using the Ribbon Workbench’s Smart Buttons.

In case you haven’t yet installed Smart Buttons in your Ribbon Workbench for your organization – Here’s a post for that – Install Smart Buttons for Ribbon Workbench | XrmToolBox

Now that it’s given you might have installed Smart Buttons already, let’s review how you can use the Run Report button for your Organization

Scenario

For this example – have an HTTP Flow which I want to call using the Smart Button in Ribbon Workbench


For that matter, you can call a Webhook using Run Webhook Smart Button in Ribbon Workbench, let’s see how.

Run Webhooks button

Before we begin, add the entity-only in a Solution and then load it up into Ribbon Workbench –

  1. You can see the Run Webhook button in the Ribbon Workbench menu as below.

  2. When you drag it on the ribbon on the (on the Account Form in this example), you’ll see the below parameters pop-up.
    Title should have the title of the Button to be called on the ribbon.
    Web Hook URL should have the complete URL for the Webhook – An HTTP Flow here.
    Start Confirmation Text should have the text which should be displayed on the confirmation dialog when you trigger this button for Webhook.
    Success Callback JavaScript should have the JS snippet of what should happen if the Webhook call succeeds.
    Error Callback JavaScript should have the JS snippet of what should happen if the Webhook call fails.

  3. Once you click OK, you should see the button show up on the ribbon where you have added it.


  4. You can double-click the button here and see if you need to add any additional properties.

  5. Once you are done, you can publish your changes.

Working

Now, that the changes have been published, let’s look at the Ribbon button –

  1. When you refresh the form, you’ll see that the button has now appeared.

  2. And when you click the same, you’ll be asked the text you entered in the pop-up dialog.

  3. Once you click OK, the Webhook will be triggered and the Flow will be hit (in this example)

  4. In this scenario, it’ll only pass the id of the record.

Hope this helps!

Here are some Power Automate posts you want to check out –

  1. Select the item based on a key value using Filter Array in Power Automate
  2. Select values from an array using Select action in a Power Automate Flow
  3. Blocking Attachment Extensions in Dynamics 365 CRM
  4. Upgrade Dataverse for Teams Environment to Dataverse Environment
  5. Showing Sandbox or Non Production Apps in Power App mobile app
  6. Create a Power Apps Per User Plan Trial | Dataverse environment
  7. Install On-Premise Gateway from Power Automate or Power Apps | Power Platform
  8. Co-presence in Power Automate | Multiple users working on a Flow
  9. Search Rows (preview) Action in Dataverse connector in a Flow | Power Automate
  10. Suppress Workflow Header Information while sending back HTTP Response in a Flow | Power Automate
  11. Call a Flow from Canvas Power App and get back response | Power Platform\
  12. FetchXML Aggregation in a Flow using CDS (Current Environment) connector | Power Automate
  13. Parsing Outputs of a List Rows action using Parse JSON in a Flow | Common Data Service (CE) connector
  14. Asynchronous HTTP Response from a Flow | Power Automate
  15. Validate JSON Schema for HTTP Request trigger in a Flow and send Response | Power Automate
  16. Converting JSON to XML and XML to JSON in a Flow | Power Automate

Thank you!