Setting Retry Policy for an HTTP request in a Flow | Power Automate

Often times, There could be an issue where your HTTP request isn’t hitting well. So, to overcome this, you might want your Flow to Retry after a certain duration and for some number of times.

You want to setup a Retry policy for the same. Here’s how you do it!

Setting Retry Policy

Follow this to setup a Retry Policy of your Flow

  1. Locate your HTTP step and navigate to Settings
    openSettings

  2. Once you’re in Settings pane, scroll below and look for Retry Policy.
    retryPolicyLocation

  3. Default type is set by default, if you expand it, you can select what should be the Retry Type. In  this example, I’ve set to Fixed Interval for simplicity
    Default is set to 4 retries at an exponential interval. (Exponential increment type is a little confusing to explain, you can check this post as users discuss how exponential time increments work – )fixedInterval
  4. In Fixed Interval type, I’ve set number of retry count to be 3 and duration between each retry should be 30 seconds (represented in ISO-8601 format)
    sampleRetrySet
  5. With that, the policy is set. And the HTTP request step will try for 3 times at the interval of 30 seconds each.

 

If you want to test using some HTTP request, you can sample HTTP requests from here – https://httpstat.us/

How it works

Look for Failed Runs to see the result –

  1. Open a Failed Run where you know HTTP request could have failed
    openFailedRun
  2. Now, look for your HTTP request where you set the policy on. Expand the same.
    openHTTPCallThatFailed
  3. Upon expanding, you can see that there were 3 retries and it failed due to a timeout i.e. 408
    failedRetries
  4. You can also check on the right hand side of the page which says that the total duration of all these retries were 1 min 30 seconds
    totalFixedTime

If you observe the Flow Runs, you can find the the Flow did consistently try to run at an interval for the number of times specified.

In case you’re looking for more Flow/Power Automate related posts, check below –

  1. Make HTTP request from Flow in Power Automate
  2. Using Parse JSON to read individual List Records in Flow|Power Automate
  3. Selecting (Current) in Environment in Power Automate CDS connector and why it matters
  4. Retrieve only active Dynamics 365 CE licensed Users in CDS connector in Power Automate
  5. Secure Input/Output in Power Automate Run History
  6. Approval Process using Power Automate
  7. Create a To-Do List Item of Important Outlook Emails using Power Automate
  8. RSS notifications to your phone using Power Automate
  9. Enable Flow button on D365 Ribbon
  10. Button Flow in Power Automate to replicate a Quick Create Form in D365 CE

Hope this helps!!

Using Parse JSON to read individual List Records in Flow|Power Automate

This is a scenario I came across when I was using Common Data Service connector [not Common Data Service (Current Environment)] connector to read Opportunities tied to an Account.

Example

In this scenario, I wanted to retrieve the Opportunities tied to an Account. So, my filter query was _parentaccountid_value(‘ACCOUNT_IDENTIFIER’)

Here’s my Flow starts. I want to read Opportunities that are tied to my Account in context –

baseQuery

Flow Inside a solution vs. Outside a Solution

Inside a Solution

Now, when I had this Flow inside a solution, the result didn’t have a body and instead just gave me Status Reason value as below –

missingData

Outside a Solution

Whereas, outside the Solution, I was able to get the array of Objects i.e. Opportunity data in the Body in the Output itself.
outsideSolutionResult

So, what can we do about the Flow which is used inside a Solution and you want to actually see what was the output? You may or may not require to see the records (depending on your implementation)

But let’s say you want to see what was returned, let’s just parse these results as is using Parse JSON to see what we got.

Use Parse JSON from Data Operation

Another way to read what you’re retrieving is using Parse JSON Data Operation.

  1. Search Parse JSON and you’ll see the result in Data Operation type of Actions as shown below –useParseJSON
  2. Now, you have to apply this to Current item from the retrieved List records in Apply to each operation. In case you don’t have the schema or not sure what to put it in. Simply use {} in Schema field. This will just pass through as is.
    applyParseJSON

Checking Result

Now, let’s test using the above and see if we can get the results

  1. Now, you can actually see the Inputs and Output of Parse JSON which is basically the same. This is useful if you want to visually see what’s going on through your Flow.
    visibleResult

But, if you don’t want to see what’s being passed through when in Production? You can Secure Input/Output in Power Automate Run History

Hope this helps you!!

Selecting (Current) in Environment in Power Automate CDS connector and why it matters

If you’re new to Power Automate, you must be wondering why am I given an option to select either (Current) or the actual name of the environment. Why can’t I just select the actual name?
selectEnv

Well, here’s why –

Importing into Other environments

So, when you import your Flow / Power Automate into other environment using a solution, be it from Sandbox to Production or to entirely different org in different tenant, here’s the behavior

(Current) selection

currentSelected

And if you Export this Flow and import into other Organizations, you can simply restore the connections to that organization by simply selecting the connection
authenticateCurrent

And it will be loaded with the current environment(s) as it was on the source environment
currentLoaded

Environment selection

Whereas now, if you have exported the Flow with Environments selected as the particular environment and not (Current) like below –
envSelect

When you import this into other environment, and when you try to authenticate, it will not go through and you’ll see something like this –
corruptedEnv

And if you wonder what the Org name is displayed in the picture above, it’s the Org Unique Name of the source environment
uniqueNameOfOldOrg

And that’s why, it’s critical to select (Current) environment when you develop flows and you know you want to have these imported to other environments.
Here’s Microsoft’s Current Environment connector’s official Docs – https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/connectors/commondataserviceforapps?WT.mc_id=DX-MVP-5003911

Hope this helps!

Secure Input/Output in Power Automate Run History

Isn’t it just too easy to see from Flow (Power Automate’s) Runs what data was passed on? A simple switch in the Power Automate designer will secure this.

Default Behavior

By default, if you have access to the Flow, you can simply go in and see the inputs
openData

Secure Input / Output

In the Flow designer, you can select and step and go to Settings
settings

And turn on Secure Input / Output depending on what you want. It says this is still in Preview as of the day of writing this post.
turnOnInputs.png

Once this is Active, it is denoted by a Lock symbol on the step you enabled it on.
denoted by Lock.png

And now, when you try to look at the data, it will hide away the information
securedData.png
Note: Please note that this will run only for the Run History records after this was turned on. The previous records will continue to show the data.

Also, in case you’re curious to know about the Approval Process using Power Automate, you can refer this post – Approval Process using Power Automate

Hope this helps!!